Graham Sustainability Institute

Water Center Products

Use the search feature below to find Water Center supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets. Alternatively, you may search/browse products across the entire institute.

Displaying 81 - 90 of 112
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Coastal restoration efforts are critical to restoring habitat, but projects are often carried out with little to no monitoring and evaluation of success. Without monitoring and evaluation, it is difficult to make comparisons across restoration designs to determine which are most functional, sustainable, and cost-effective. This reality, in combination with limited “best practices” resources for coastal restoration, significantly hinders project implementation.

May 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Nature-based shoreline stabilization techniques have the potential to maintain and enhance important ecological services, provide greater resilience to physical forces, and be cost-competitive with traditional approaches. Over the past eight years, the Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project has engaged a regional team to develop the information and tools needed by regulators, engineers, and resource managers. These groups will identify the best settings and approaches for nature-based shoreline protection in the Hudson Estuary. Considerable knowledge is available about alternative techniques, current research, and regional conditions. However, there is a need to develop a common understanding of what resources are available, what is still needed, and how the review of proposed actions could be standardized.

May 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

The health of the Great Bay Estuary is strongly influenced by stressors from across the watershed. Seven rivers flow into the estuary, which is recessed 15 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. While science and case studies clearly demonstrate the value of vegetated buffers along these rivers in promoting a healthy estuary, New Hampshire does not yet consistently or effectively use buffers to protect the Great Bay Estuary. This project will enhance stakeholder capacity to make informed decisions on the protection and restoration of buffers around the Great Bay Estuary by addressing the following question: What are the options for addressing the challenges to effectively protect and restore buffer zones around New Hampshire’s Great Bay?

May 2016
Publication Photo
Fact Sheet

In estuaries worldwide, the loss of salt marshes and oyster reefs has been alarming, especially along high-energy coastlines. To dampen boat wake and wave stress, mitigate erosion, and restore oysters, managers are using more natural bank stabilization techniques—often referred to as living shorelines—adjacent to salt marsh edges. These efforts have been largely unsuccessful in achieving coastal management goals under the most destructive, high-energy conditions. This project will test the efficacy of a new strategy for protecting coastal habitat in high-energy environments. A research team will integrate engineering and ecological approaches by deploying “gabion-breaks,” a hybrid method for building living shorelines to protect and restore coastlines. Over three years, boat wake and wave energy, oyster reef development, and salt marsh edge movement will be monitored along reaches of shoreline with and without gabion-breaks.

May 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Climate change will significantly affect coastal habitats as sea levels, storms, erosion, and water quality change. However, the impacts on different habitats in different locations will vary, and it is not clear how coastal managers should best protect vulnerable habitats such as marshes, seagrass beds, and dunes. A more complete understanding of risks could help coastal managers prioritize actions that could enhance the resilience of coastal habitats. A new tool has been developed, the Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH), to help land managers, decision makers, and researchers develop conservation management, and restoration plans for coastal habitats. This assessment tool identifies primary sources of vulnerability to assist with prioritizing coastal habitat management actions.

April 2016
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

Authors:
Joan Nassauer, Margaret Dewar, Shawn McElmurry, Natalie Sampson, Alicia Alvarez, Allen Burton, Catherine Riseng, Amy Schulz, Noah Webster, & Nathaniel Lichten.

Report topic:
An introduction to the NEW-GI project with preliminary results of a 2015 pre-construction survey of residents living nearby vacant property selected as pilot sites for NEW-GI stormwater bioretention gardens.

April 2016
Fact Sheet Cover
Fact Sheet

Research scientist David Schwab simulated 840 hypothetical spill cases. In the most comprehensive study of Line 5 oil spill impacts publicly available, Schwab presents three potential levels of oil discharge — measured in barrels (bbl), each containing 42 US gallons of oil — including 5,000 bbl, 10,000 bbl and 25,000 bbl in the report. Schwab simulated 840 hypothetical spill cases. More than 700 miles of shoreline in Lakes Michigan and Huron and their islands are potentially vulnerable to an oil release in the Straits. This summary provides an overview of the key findings, based on the full report, Statistical Analysis of Straits of Mackinac Line 5: Worst Case Spill Scenarios (March 2016). 

March 2016
Fact Sheet

This summary report presents key results of a study to identify potential options for managing agricultural phosphorus loads and lessening future Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie.  The research team applied multiple watershed models to test the ability of a series of land management scenarios, developed in consultation with agricultural and environmental stakeholders, to reach the proposed phosphorus loading targets.

March 2016
Paper/Project Report
The overall goal of this study was to identify potential options for agricultural management to reduce phosphorus loads and lessen future Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie.  The research team applied multiple watershed models to test the ability of a series of land management scenarios, developed in consultation with agricultural and environmental stakeholders, to reach the proposed phosphorus loading targets.
 
This report was compiled by the University of Michigan Water Center with funding from the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.
March 2016
Fact Sheet

This fact sheet describes a new collaborative research project facilitated by the U-M Water Center. This study will model the nutrient dynamics within the watersheds that drain into the St. Clair and Detroit rivers. The planned modeling approach is designed to characterize Detroit River nutrient loads to Lake Erie and then compare the efficacy of different management options. A project advisory group has been assembled to provide feedback on the policy context, planned research approach, and potential information products. For more information, see project web page.

March 2016

Pages