Products

Use the search feature below to find Water Center supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

Displaying 51 - 60 of 67
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

The national estuarine research reserves form a network of coastal sites protected for long-term stewardship, research, and education. To support this mission, the reserves conduct long-term monitoring of water quality, weather, coastal habitat, and biological communities using consistent methods. This system-wide monitoring program has great value to support coastal resource management and research. However, this value has not been fully realized because reserve staffs often lack the time, technical expertise, and computational resources to analyze large, complex data sets. This project will provide research staff members from the mid-Atlantic reserves with targeted tools, graphical support, and training to facilitate the use of reserve monitoring data. The project team will focus on deciphering trends in water quality parameters, which are related to management issues such as storm surge mitigation. Through workshops and the development of statistical applications, this project will increase capacity to distill monitoring data into a format that resource managers can use. The project team will share their approach and project outputs with the larger reserve system, and collectively, these efforts will demonstrate the value of the reserve monitoring program.

February 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Communities in the Kenai Peninsula are already coping with a variety of impacts related to a warming climate, including reductions in wetland areas, glacial ice coverage, and freshwater availability, and increases in temperatures, ocean acidification, and harmful algal blooms. Efforts to document these recent changes will be leveraged to create tangible recommendations and a long-term local strategy for adaptation to rapid climate change. Barriers hindering effective climate change planning on the peninsula include the uncertainty of future trajectories, a need for a synthesis of regional data, and limited capacity for interagency collaboration. This project aims to address these needs and help coastal communities on the Kenai Peninsula plan for a changing climate.

Drawing upon experience using scenario planning to help local communities prepare for climate change in the Tijuana River Valley (Southern California), the project team will use the best available science to facilitate local dialogue addressing how climate change may impact the Kenai Peninsula. The project will engage regional leaders and community stakeholders to collaboratively develop plausible future planning scenarios based on a wide range of possible environmental responses to a changing climate. Ultimately this process and the resulting scenarios will help to inform area resource managers and land use planners as they lay the groundwork for future research, regulation, and development. Additionally, the project will document the process and lessons learned to further demonstrate the applicability of scenario planning across geographically distinct communities.

February 2016
Fact Sheet

The National Estuarine Research Reserve System has a proven track record of successfully transferring and translating reserve science to a broad suite of educators through teacher workshops. In recent years, teachers have expressed a need for curriculum, data sets, and professional development related to climate change. This grant will enable the New England reserves to develop and offer a series of high-quality teacher workshops focused on the story of climate change impacts on coastal habitats, using a variety of data collected at the reserves. The delivery of new and existing curricula will arm over 50 teachers with the tools and confidence they need to effectively bring the discussion of climate change into the classroom.

February 2016
Fishwerks logo
Tool/Model

Fishwerks is a web-based decision support tool that allows users to access optimization tools that identify barriers which, if removed, would maximize habitat improvements for migratory fish in the Great Lakes Basin. This tool was developed by Dr. Peter McIntyre and his team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with support from several partners including the Water Center.

For more information, see the project page.

February 2016
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

This paper describes work to develop a model of micrplastic-toxin interactions in freshwater environments. It is a product of the Microplastics in the Great Lakes project supported by the Water Center.

By Jeanne M. Hankett, William R. Collin, Pei Yang, Zhan Chen, and Melissa Duhaime

January 2016
Fact Sheet

The City of Detroit has over 80,000 vacant residential properties and is demolishing thousands of vacant houses each year. This project uses Detroit’s vacant property demolition process as an opportunity to design and assess green infrastructure innovations that aim to make rivers cleaner and neighborhoods more attractive as a result of the demolition process. It will also identify governance processes that support the long term success of Green Infrastructure. Vegetation and soils are used to soak up and store storm water. Project partners have constructed high efficiency storm water storage, filling former sites of abandoned houses with beautiful flower gardens called bioretention gardens.

December 2015
Fact Sheet

The University of Michigan Water Center addresses critical and emerging water resource challenges. We are driven by the desire to ensure management of our water resources is informed by the best possible science. Our mission is to improve the policy and management decisions that affect our waters by integrating decision makers and other end users into collaborative research projects. This integration fosters learning by all participants and the co-production of high-quality, usable, science-based information that can lead to innovative solutions. We also design and implement innovative grant-making processes that support collaborative research.

October 2015
Tool/Model

This professional network was established in 2015 and includes profiles of water-focused faculty members and institutions from across the state. Its purpose is to promote connections and collaborations around issues affecting Michigan’s water resources, with benefits for both the research community and state quality of life agency personnel. Michigan’s Quality of Life agencies include the Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), the Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD).

October 2015
Paper/Project Report

Co-authored by Joseph DePinto of LimnoTech and Margaret Kalcic of the U-M Water Center, this proceedings document describes a regional Great Lakes SWAT Modeling workshop hosted by the Water Center in March 2014. SWAT, which stands for Soil Water Assessment Tool, is a powerful model that allows users to determine the impacts of land management practices on water, sediment, and nutrient yields in agricultural watersheds. It is used frequently to answer land management questions and to inform nonpoint source pollution control decisions in agricultural watersheds such as Western Lake Erie, Green Bay, and Saginaw Bay.

July 2014
Video

These animated videos created by David J. Schwab of the University of Michigan Water Center with support from the National Wildlife Federation show the wide extent to which an oil spill beneath the Straits of Mackinac could impact Great Lakes ecology, wildlife, and coastal communities. The U-M Water Center is a center of U-M's Graham Sustainability Institute.

July 2014

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