Graham Sustainability Institute

Products

Use the search feature below to find Water Center supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

Displaying 51 - 60 of 98
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Fact Sheet

Sea-level rise and extreme weather events exacerbated by climate change currently impact Maine’s coastline and are anticipated to increase in frequency and strength. Beach-based businesses, a powerful economic engine for Maine, are generally little prepared for storm surge and coastal flooding. Yet lessons learned from previous disasters underscore how important the recovery of businesses is to the overall recovery of a region’s economy. 

October 2016
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Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of a project that makes data and information compiled through the Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative readily available to ninth-grade earth science teachers to use in their classrooms and increase climate literacy. The project builds on a previous NOAA Bay Watershed Education and Training project titled, “Climate Education for a Changing Bay (CECB),” which provided watershed educational experiences integrated into the classroom curriculum for ninth-grade students in Gloucester County and Mathews County, Virginia.

Through the current project, the Chesapeake Bay-Virginia Reserve is building on the strengths of the previous years of CECB to extend the reach into Middlesex County, while developing an alumni program to support the program in Gloucester and Mathews. All three counties lie within a region experiencing relative rates of sea level rise greater than the global average.

 

October 2016
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Fact Sheet

This factsheet provides an overview of a project focusing on the development and dissemination of communications products based on a recently conducted national synthesis of NERR Sentinel Site data. This synthesis applied indices of resilience to sea level rise to marshes in 16 National Estuarine Research Reserves across the United States to assess regional and national patterns in resilience. Initial results reveal strong contrasts for individual metrics across reserves, with many marshes receiving intermediate scores and a few sites at very high risk. This work not only represents the first national assessment of marsh resilience to sea level rise but also the first development and application of multi-metric indices.

October 2016
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Fact Sheet

Climate change is having an impact on salt marshes in the southeastern United States through sea level rise, increases in air and water temperature, changes in precipitation patterns, and an increase in storm event intensity. However, the degree and intensity of these impacts vary from marsh to marsh, depending on local environmental conditions. Understanding this local variability is critical when making management decisions. Estuarine reserves in North and South Carolina are seeking to improve local understanding of climate change effects on southeastern marshes, and provide decision makers with the information and skills they need to address these vulnerabilities, by using the Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats, or CCVATCH.

October 2016
Graphic

The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a spatially referenced watershed model used to simulate the impacts of land use, land management, and climate on water quantity and quality. This graphic illustrates the general processes associated with developing and applying SWAT models. Learn more: SWAT FAQ

October 2016
Graphic

This graphic illustrates how remote sensing, paired with field surveys, fits into the adaptive management cycle required for the treatment and control of the invasive wetland plant Phragmites. These techniques were applied in Saginaw Bay and Green Bay. Remote sensing offers managers a “bird’s eye” view, and enables a more complete understanding of the extent of invasion, assessment of control efforts, and supports strategic decisions about where to focus limited resources within a site and across a larger landscape.

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25248

Keywords: Infographic, Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, Phragmites Management, Invasive Species, wetland plant, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Graphic

Following removal of the Wayne Road Dam on the Rouge River, researchers documented significant upstream expansion of the invasive round goby. The Wayne County Parks department, in partnership with Friends of the Rouge, is using this graphic as educational signage at public access points in Wayne County Parks. Using round goby as fishing bait is an issue of concern in these areas. See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25123

 

Keywords: invasive species, round goby, Rouge River, fish, Great Lakes, infographic, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Graphic

The Watershed graphic, part of a suite of graphics and a video, illustrates the magnitude of phosphorus and sediment input to Green Bay from the predominantly agricultural Fox River watershed. The graphics may be used separately or as a group.

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25121

See video (Green Bay Ecosystem Modeling): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkpBjHvzRryrXo2uj3j3BHoTFtgpJjvjz

Keywords: Infographic, Green Bay, Great Lakes restoration, watershed, Wisconsin, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Saginaw Bay Optimization Model Video
Video

Saginaw Bay is a highly valued yet highly stressed system. To help ensure the right conservation practices are applied to the right places, in the right amount, and as efficiently as possible, the project team developed an innovative tool, known as the Saginaw Bay Optimization Model. This video describes how the Optimization Model produces solutions for implementing agricultural best management practices in the watershed. 

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25115

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, Saginaw Bay Watershed, conservation practices, optmization model, agricultural best management practices

September 2016
Video

This video depicts and describes the Benefits of Collaborative Research. U-M Water Center-supported research team use a unique approach to developing research outputs that address real-world resource management and policy decisions. A collaborative research approach requires a clearly articulated and demonstrated policy or management need, and the integration of users of the research throughout the project development and research phases. 

 

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, collaborative research, water science, water resource management and policy, co-production, science communications 

September 2016

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