Graham Sustainability Institute

Products

Use the search feature below to find Water Center supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

Displaying 51 - 60 of 90
Saginaw Bay Optimization Model Video
Video

Saginaw Bay is a highly valued yet highly stressed system. To help ensure the right conservation practices are applied to the right places, in the right amount, and as efficiently as possible, the project team developed an innovative tool, known as the Saginaw Bay Optimization Model. This video describes how the Optimization Model produces solutions for implementing agricultural best management practices in the watershed. 

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25115

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, Saginaw Bay Watershed, conservation practices, optmization model, agricultural best management practices

September 2016
Video

This video depicts and describes the Benefits of Collaborative Research. U-M Water Center-supported research team use a unique approach to developing research outputs that address real-world resource management and policy decisions. A collaborative research approach requires a clearly articulated and demonstrated policy or management need, and the integration of users of the research throughout the project development and research phases. 

 

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, collaborative research, water science, water resource management and policy, co-production, science communications 

September 2016
Video

The project team measured the ecological, social, and economic impacts of public private partnerships to restore wetlands in New York state. This video highlights the benefits of participating in these programs to landowners and surrounding communities.

 

Keywords: Wetland Restoration, New York State, Landowners, University of Michigan Water Center

August 2016
Video

This video describes how high nutrient and sediment loads delivered to Green Bay drive recurring summer hypoxia and algal blooms. It outlines the project team’s development of a linked model framework for simulating how the Green Bay system works, and how the Bay might respond to changes in climate, land use, and/or land management decisions.

 

Keywords: Green Bay, Wisconsin, hypoxia, algal blooms, University of Michigan Water Center, algae

August 2016
Video

Fluctuating lake levels adds complexity to responsible planning in coastal communities. This video describes what happens to the coast as lake levels fluctuate, the implications for coastal communities, and the techniques the project team developed to help communities plan with fluctuating lake levels in mind.

 

Keywords: Great Lakes water levels, coastal communities, fluctuation, University of Michigan Water Center

August 2016
Fact Sheet

Living shorelines show great promise in coastal South Carolina as a tool to control erosion, increase habitat, and protect coastal areas from hazards both short-term (e.g., storms) and long-term (e.g., sea level rise). The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and the Ashepoo, Combahee, and Edisto (ACE) Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve have constructed oyster-reef-based living shorelines adjacent to public land for 15 years, and private property owners are also showing interest in using living shorelines to prevent erosion. Current South Carolina permitting processes, however, do not address this emerging strategy, which serves as a barrier for private property owners wishing to pursue this approach. 

July 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Blue carbon storage—carbon sequestration in coastal wetlands—can help coastal managers and policymakers achieve broader wetlands management, restoration, and conservation goals, in part by securing payment for carbon credits. The Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve has been at the forefront of blue carbon research, working with end users to provide the information and tools needed to bring blue carbon projects to the carbon market. While end users are becoming more interested in the opportunities that carbon markets present, they are limited by uncertainties, particularly the potential transaction costs associated with bringing a wetland restoration project to market. 

June 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Nature-based, ecologically enhanced, or soft shoreline stabilization techniques have the potential to maintain and enhance important ecological services, provide greater resilience to physical forces, and be cost-competitive with traditional approaches. In order for these techniques to be used more widely in the Hudson River Estuary, their performance must be demonstrated and evaluated locally. Landowners, site designers, and decision makers have expressed this need to enhance their confidence in proposing innovative designs to clients, investing in sustainable shoreline construction, and steering permit applications toward these less traditional options.

May 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Coastal restoration efforts are critical to restoring habitat, but projects are often carried out with little to no monitoring and evaluation of success. Without monitoring and evaluation, it is difficult to make comparisons across restoration designs to determine which are most functional, sustainable, and cost-effective. This reality, in combination with limited “best practices” resources for coastal restoration, significantly hinders project implementation.

May 2016
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Nature-based shoreline stabilization techniques have the potential to maintain and enhance important ecological services, provide greater resilience to physical forces, and be cost-competitive with traditional approaches. Over the past eight years, the Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project has engaged a regional team to develop the information and tools needed by regulators, engineers, and resource managers. These groups will identify the best settings and approaches for nature-based shoreline protection in the Hudson Estuary. Considerable knowledge is available about alternative techniques, current research, and regional conditions. However, there is a need to develop a common understanding of what resources are available, what is still needed, and how the review of proposed actions could be standardized.

May 2016

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