Products

Use the search feature below to find Water Center supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

Displaying 41 - 50 of 82
Publication cover
Fact Sheet

Climate change is having an impact on salt marshes in the southeastern United States through sea level rise, increases in air and water temperature, changes in precipitation patterns, and an increase in storm event intensity. However, the degree and intensity of these impacts vary from marsh to marsh, depending on local environmental conditions. Understanding this local variability is critical when making management decisions. Estuarine reserves in North and South Carolina are seeking to improve local understanding of climate change effects on southeastern marshes, and provide decision makers with the information and skills they need to address these vulnerabilities, by using the Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats, or CCVATCH. Created to help managers better understand the specific vulnerabilities of a habitat to climate change, this decision-support tool incorporates existing information on climate change impacts with knowledge of local conditions to help users develop vulnerability scores for specific areas.

For this project, North Carolina Reserve staff members will be fully trained in the application of the tool and facilitation of the assessment process by their colleagues from the North Inlet-Winyah Bay Reserve. The two reserves will work together to identify relevant resources and existing research needs and develop outreach products and activities.

Keywords: Climate change, marsh, Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats

October 2016
Graphic

The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a spatially referenced watershed model used to simulate the impacts of land use, land management, and climate on water quantity and quality. This graphic illustrates the general processes associated with developing and applying SWAT models. Learn more: SWAT FAQ

SWAT was developed by researchers within the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA, ARS) in the mid-1990s, and the model has undergone continual review and expansion since it was first developed. As a result, the model is extremely well-documented in a detailed user manual and contains over 1000 peer-reviewed journal articles that describe applications and enhancements. This physical model uses mathematical equations to represent watershed processes such as hydrology, soil erosion, crop growth, and nutrient cycling on the land and in the stream network on a daily time scale. SWAT is spatially-referenced to a specific watershed or sub-watershed. Within the model, the smallest spatial units are the hydrologic response units (HRUs) which generally have uniform soil type, land use, and slopes.

Keywords: Soil and Water Assessment Tool, land use, land management, climate, water quantity and quality, model, U-M Water Center

October 2016
Graphic

This graphic illustrates how remote sensing, paired with field surveys, fits into the adaptive management cycle required for the treatment and control of the invasive wetland plant Phragmites. These techniques were applied in Saginaw Bay and Green Bay. Remote sensing offers managers a “bird’s eye” view, and enables a more complete understanding of the extent of invasion, assessment of control efforts, and supports strategic decisions about where to focus limited resources within a site and across a larger landscape.

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25248

Keywords: Infographic, Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, Phragmites Management, Invasive Species, wetland plant, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Graphic

Following removal of the Wayne Road Dam on the Rouge River, researchers documented significant upstream expansion of the invasive round goby. The Wayne County Parks department, in partnership with Friends of the Rouge, is using this graphic as educational signage at public access points in Wayne County Parks. Using round goby as fishing bait is an issue of concern in these areas. See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25123

 

Keywords: invasive species, round goby, Rouge River, fish, Great Lakes, infographic, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Graphic

The Watershed graphic, part of a suite of graphics and a video, illustrates the magnitude of phosphorus and sediment input to Green Bay from the predominantly agricultural Fox River watershed. The graphics may be used separately or as a group.

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25121

See video (Green Bay Ecosystem Modeling): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkpBjHvzRryrXo2uj3j3BHoTFtgpJjvjz

Keywords: Infographic, Green Bay, Great Lakes restoration, watershed, Wisconsin, University of Michigan Water Center

September 2016
Saginaw Bay Optimization Model Video
Video

Saginaw Bay is a highly valued yet highly stressed system. To help ensure the right conservation practices are applied to the right places, in the right amount, and as efficiently as possible, the project team developed an innovative tool, known as the Saginaw Bay Optimization Model. This video describes how the Optimization Model produces solutions for implementing agricultural best management practices in the watershed. 

See project summary: http://graham.umich.edu/activity/25115

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, Saginaw Bay Watershed, conservation practices, optmization model, agricultural best management practices

September 2016
Video

This video depicts and describes the Benefits of Collaborative Research. U-M Water Center-supported research team use a unique approach to developing research outputs that address real-world resource management and policy decisions. A collaborative research approach requires a clearly articulated and demonstrated policy or management need, and the integration of users of the research throughout the project development and research phases. 

 

Keywords: University of Michigan Water Center, collaborative research, water science, water resource management and policy, co-production, science communications 

September 2016
Video

The project team measured the ecological, social, and economic impacts of public private partnerships to restore wetlands in New York state. This video highlights the benefits of participating in these programs to landowners and surrounding communities.

 

Keywords: Wetland Restoration, New York State, Landowners, University of Michigan Water Center

August 2016
Video

This video describes how high nutrient and sediment loads delivered to Green Bay drive recurring summer hypoxia and algal blooms. It outlines the project team’s development of a linked model framework for simulating how the Green Bay system works, and how the Bay might respond to changes in climate, land use, and/or land management decisions.

 

Keywords: Green Bay, Wisconsin, hypoxia, algal blooms, University of Michigan Water Center, algae

August 2016
Video

Fluctuating lake levels adds complexity to responsible planning in coastal communities. This video describes what happens to the coast as lake levels fluctuate, the implications for coastal communities, and the techniques the project team developed to help communities plan with fluctuating lake levels in mind.

 

Keywords: Great Lakes water levels, coastal communities, fluctuation, University of Michigan Water Center

August 2016

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