David Chock

dchock's picture
Visiting Research Scientist
  • Office of the Provost
    • Institute for Social Research
248-910-0743

David P. Chock is a visiting research scientist at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.  Prior to joining the University of Michigan, he was the Senior Technical Leader in Environmental Sciences and Sustainability at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering.  He is also a member of the US EPA CASAC’s Ozone Review Panel.  His areas of research include (1) the modeling of the transport and transformation of pollutants in the atmosphere, air quality data analysis and the statistical properties of the US ozone air quality standard; (2) environmental epidemiology studying the impact of air pollutants on morbidity and mortality; (3) climate science and sustainability, including the role of the transportation sector in CO2 stabilization and well-to-wheels analysis of fuels and vehicle technology, and (4) consumers’ travel mode choice in the presence of new technology and infrastructure.  He was the recipient of the 2003 American Chemical Society’s Thomas Ridgley Award for outstanding research contributions in the field of chemistry related to the automotive industries. He received his PhD in chemical physics from the University of Chicago.David P. Chock is a visiting research scientist at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.  Prior to joining the University of Michigan, he was the Senior Technical Leader in Environmental Sciences and Sustainability at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering.  He is also a member of the US EPA CASAC’s Ozone Review Panel.  His areas of research include (1) the modeling of the transport and transformation of pollutants in the atmosphere, air quality data analysis and the statistical properties of the US ozone air quality standard; (2) environmental epidemiology studying the impact of air pollutants on morbidity and mortality; (3) climate science and sustainability, including the role of the transportation sector in CO2 stabilization and well-to-wheels analysis of fuels and vehicle technology, and (4) consumers’ travel mode choice in the presence of new technology and infrastructure.  He was the recipient of the 2003 American Chemical Society’s Thomas Ridgley Award for outstanding research contributions in the field of chemistry related to the automotive industries. He received his PhD in chemical physics from the University of Chicago.