Emerging Opportunities

Emerging Opportunities Summary Infographic

The Emerging Opportunities program, part of the Graham Sustainability Institute, supports collaborative sustainability research and assessment activities that span multiple disciplines and sectors and connect science to real-world decisions and actions. To support these efforts, which range from one-time meetings and workshops to multi-year projects, we offer a variety of regular funding opportunities and resources. This summary outlines a variety of funding opportunities.

For more information, see Emerging Opportunities

Graham Sustainability Funding & Networking Event for U-M Faculty

The Sustainability Funding & Networking Event brought together faculty and researchers from across campus to learn about funding available through Graham's Emerging Opportunities Program and to network around sustainability interest areas.

Agenda

Graham staff provided an overview of current funding opportunities, and recently-funded investigators shared lightning talks highlighting how their projects meet the characteristics of the funding program.

Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Factsheet

There has recently been an increase in natural gas extraction efforts across the U.S., including in Michigan. Much of this increase is due to the expanded use of the process called hydraulic fracturing–popularly known as “fracking,” a method of natural gas extraction used since the 1940s. Fracking has been at the center of both wide support and concern by community members, industry, and state governments.

International Water and Health

Ensuring access to safe water supplies and creating good management strategies are fundamental to improving global health and sustainability. Yet the barriers to doing so are multifaceted and complex. To address these barriers and improve global health equity, the U-M Graham Sustainability Institute partnered with the U-M Center for Global Health to co-sponsor two Integrated Assessment research projects in Ghana and Peru.

Managing Cleveland's Stormwater through Green Design

Hundreds of U.S. cities, with a combined population of about 40 million people, have water infrastructure where stormwater and human sewage mingle in the same network of underground pipes. In a combined sewer system, rainwater typically enters storm drains, mixes with sewage, and is directed to a water treatment plant. The treated water is then discharged into a nearby stream, river, or lake. Occasionally, an influx of snowmelt or heavy rainfall can overwhelm treatment plants.

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