Graham Sustainability Institute

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Search below to access a wide array of products that were generated or supported by the Graham Institute. For more U-M publications related to sustainability, search the U-M Deep Blue database.

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Video
Video

Fellow Kenneth J. Fennell Jr. from the U-M Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy shares the team’s idea to increase accessibility to shared use mobile technologies for high risk, low-income communities in Detroit, MI by enacting Caravan, a social platform tool allowing users to find and access transportation.
 
The project team includes other fellows from Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, U-M School for Environment and Sustainability and U-M School of Social Work.
 

Keywords: Dow Sustainability Fellows Program at the University of Michigan, The Dow Chemical Company Foundation, fellowships, Detroit, transportation

November 2017
Video
Video

Fellow Harry Wolberg from the U-M Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy shares the team’s idea for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and organic waste at U-M through a biodigester, a facility that captures the methane gas from decomposing waste to be used to generate renewable energy.
 
The project team includes other fellows from the U-M School for Environment and Sustainability, U-M Law School and U-M Stephen M. Ross School of Business.

 

Keywords: Dow Sustainability Fellows Program at the University of Michigan, The Dow Chemical Company Foundation, fellowships, waste reduction.

November 2017
Crooks Fact Sheet
Fact Sheet

Southern California lagoons are complex environments that require informed management practices. In their natural states, many of these lagoons periodically open and close to the sea. However, watershed alterations and lagoon inlet modifications have reduced their capacity to open and close as they usually do.

In response, coastal managers have begun to manage these lagoons to remain open for water quality purposes. However, scientists and managers have recently been reconsidering this one-size-fits-all approach to lagoon management. Managing a lagoon mouth to be continually open can be expensive. It also may compromise the lagoon’s unique biodiversity and ecosystem services. 

This project analyzed existing lagoon mouth literature and long-term monitoring data from the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve to provide managers with the information needed to improve the health of Southern California’s coastal lagoons.

November 2017
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

This article about the Crow House project highlights the effort to address both the need for energy efficient housing and access to healthy food. A University of Michigan (U-M) team of graduate students interested in urban socioecology developed the Crow House project. Inspired in part by the settlement house tradition popular at the turn of the 20th century, students began implementing a plan that focused on creating common ground for community and college collaboration among local activists, agencies, and scholars living in neighborhoods. Also, see the project summary.

 

Keywords: Dow Sustainability Fellowship Program, University of Michigan, Detroit

November 2017
Graham 2017 DEI Summary Report and 2018 Actions
Paper/Project Report

This report – Graham 2017 DEI Summary Report and 2018 Actions – summarizes the strategic diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) activities of the Graham Institute during 2017, the first year of a 5-year plan. It also summarizes the planned DEI activities for 2018. This is a summary of the full DEI report, see: http://graham.umich.edu/diversity to access full reports, updates, and links to the U-M -wide DEI effort.

October 2017
Monitoring Data Analysis Fact Sheet
Fact Sheet

The National Estuarine Research Reserve System forms a network of coastal sites protected for long-term stewardship, research, and education. To support this mission, the reserve system established the System-Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) in 1995 to conduct long-term monitoring of water quality, weather, coastal habitat, and biological communities using consistent methods. The monitoring program is critical for reserve coastal management and research. However, realizing the full value of the program is limited by the lack of time, technical expertise, and computational resources reserves have for analyzing large, complex data sets. 

October 2017
Paper/Project Report

In this handbook social science researchers who focus on sustainability present and discuss their findings, including empirical work, case studies, teaching and learning innovations, and applied projects. As such, the book offers a basis for the dissemination of information, ideas, and experiences acquired in the execution of research projects, especially initiatives which have influenced behavior, decision-making, or policy. Furthermore, it introduces methodological approaches and projects which aim to offer a better understanding of sustainability across society, and economic sectors. This multidisciplinary overview presents the work of researchers from across the spectrum of the social sciences. It stimulates innovative thinking on how social sciences influence sustainable development and vice-versa.

Editors: Leal Filho, Walter, Marans, Robert W., Callewaert, John

October 2017
Resilience Dialogues Fact Sheet
Fact Sheet

National Estuarine Research Reserves have been designing and implementing a new approach to collaborative science since 2009. This approach emphasizes the integration of scientific knowledge with local management and place-based knowledge. Collaborative processes facilitate the co-creation of knowledge to integrate diverse perspectives, identify common interests, and use resources effectively so that scientific findings are management ready, and can be applied to address the most pressing coastal management issues.

October 2017
Fact Sheet

There is growing evidence that the New England coast faces mounting challenges due to sea level rise. One of the ways sea level rise threatens the coast is through degradation and loss of salt marshes. Salt marshes play an important role for society in maintaining healthy fisheries, mitigating shoreline erosion, reducing flooding, and protecting water quality. Research has identified southern New England salt marshes as among the most vulnerable in the country, prompting researchers and practitioners to evaluate mechanisms of resilience and opportunities for conservation and management of these important ecosystems.

October 2017
Fact Sheet

This project develops educational materials and tools to educate the general public and decision-makers about the ways engineered land-use changes affect water quality, fisheries, and human health in the region around Grand Bay, Mississippi. Research from a previous Science Collaborative research project, Legacy Effects of Land-Use Change and Nitrogen Source Shifts on a Benchmark System, will inform the educational materials produced. Researchers reviewed the history of land-use change in the region and how it shifted nutrient and pathogen sources within the Grand Bay system over time. At the end of the project, the research team and stakeholders worked together to determine what educational outreach materials produced from the research results were of the greatest value to enhance local water quality.

October 2017

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