Graham Sustainability Institute

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Search below to access a wide array of products that were generated or supported by the Graham Institute. For more U-M publications related to sustainability, search the U-M Deep Blue database.

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Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Biological monitoring programs are essential foundations for effective management of estuaries and coasts, but they can be expensive to conduct and may be traumatic for the target species. Advancements in DNA methods now make it possible to identify the organisms in an area by the DNA they leave behind. Environmental DNA (eDNA) comes from feces, gametes, scales, and cells that an organism sheds, and is easily collected from water and sediment samples. Rapid reductions in analytical costs now allow scientists to analyze eDNA in water samples and identify dozens of species without having to capture live animals or plants.

This project will work collaboratively with resource managers in Oregon, Maine, and New Hampshire to pilot and refine DNA-based monitoring protocols that can be applied to specific issues and species of interest in estuarine ecosystems.

March 2018
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

The Kenai Lowlands cover 9,400 square kilometers, with much of the area comprised of wetlands and over half of the landscape characterized as peatlands. These wetlands sequester large stores of carbon, preventing the carbon from entering the atmosphere. In 2016, at the request of the Kachemak Bay Community Council, a group of municipalities, government agencies, and local nonprofits, the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve partnered with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to conduct pilot tests of saltmarsh carbon sequestration. The results spurred interest in blue carbon valuation throughout the region. 

March 2018
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

In 2016, the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve hosted a workshop series to develop strategies for coping with coastal climate change on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. The workshops were the result of a Science Collaborative Science Transfer grant, as well as involvement in the Successful Adaptation Indicators and Metrics Science Collaborative project.

February 2018
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

Coastal managers are faced with the challenge of managing marsh hydrology in a way that meets human health needs, optimizes ecosystem services, and supports sustainability. In New England this includes accounting for the effects of ditches that were dug decades ago in 90% of the region’s salt marshes.

February 2018
Paper/Project Report

Prepared by:
Maggie Allan, John Callewaert, and Kyle Olsen
University of Michigan Graham Sustainability Institute

February 2018
Paper/Project Report

Prepared by:
Maggie Allan, John Callewaert, and Kyle Olsen
University of Michigan Graham Sustainability Institute

February 2018
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

The Gulf Coast continues to lose coastal wetlands at an alarming rate. This has negative implications for water quality, shoreline stability, habitat protection, and greenhouse gas sequestration. Coastal blue carbon is a newly recognized ecosystem service provided by coastal wetlands—including seagrass beds, mangroves, and salt marshes—to capture and store carbon. When coastal wetlands are degraded or destroyed, they release these greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Bolstering awareness and valuation of blue carbon could lead to increased prioritization of coastal conservation and restoration projects, and increase public and private funding for these types of projects. Moreover, coastal managers are now being asked to consider the greenhouse gas implications of their decisions, and Gulf Coast National Estuarine Research Reserves have recently identified blue carbon as a priority topic.

January 2018
Publication Cover
Fact Sheet

This project addressed two barriers to the advancement of public understanding of science. First, there is a need for more K-12 teaching resources and professional development designed to help teachers demonstrate scientific research practices and teach critical thinking skills. Second, while the best source of authentic, current, and topical research is scientists themselves, research scientists are not often trained to communicate their science to a broad audience. This project sought to address these challenges by the following:

  • Enhancing K-12 science curricula by providing teachers with resources that offer authentic examples of the research process and how science is applied to solve problems.
  • Enhancing graduate students’ science communication skills by providing formal training and an opportunity to translate their research into activities for secondary classrooms.
January 2018
Video
Video

Dow Fellow Lee Taylor-Penn from the U-M Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and U-M School of Public Health shares the team’s idea to increase food security in West Tallahatchie, MS by utilizing research and the voices of the community to develop an actionable report the community could use improve food security in the area.

January 2018
Video
Video

Dow Fellows Robert Meyer from the U-M School for Environment and Sustainability and U-M College of Engineering, Shivani Kamodia from the U-M School of Dentistry, Mary-Catherine Goddard from the U-M School of Public Health and Elizabeth Yates from the U-M Medical School share the team’s goals to discover and provide sustainability recommendations in a toolkit that can be used by dental professionals to implement environmentally-friendly practices.

January 2018

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