Graham Sustainability Institute

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Search below to access a wide array of products that were generated or supported by the Graham Institute. For more U-M publications related to sustainability, search the U-M Deep Blue database.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 407
Paper/Project Report

SPOUTS is a ceramic water filter manufacturer based in Uganda that aims to provide an effective and affordable water filter to households that lack access to clean water. A Dow Distinguished Award student team is working with Sustainability Without Borders to conduct consumer surveys and a social life cycle assessment to develop a deeper understanding of the social and environmental impact of SPOUTS water filters. This past summer, the U-M team traveled to Uganda to interview community members, distribute the filters and surveys, and train enumerators so they could survey the people after the team left. The team also purchased and donated 12 water filters to two primary schools to engage with the community. They helped install the filters, demonstrated use and maintenance, and provided education on water-borne illnesses.

April 2020
Fact Sheet

SPOUTS is a ceramic water filter manufacturer based in Uganda that aims to provide an effective and affordable water filter to households that lack access to clean water. A Dow Distinguished Award student team is working with Sustainability Without Borders to conduct consumer surveys and a social life cycle assessment to develop a deeper understanding of the social and environmental impact of SPOUTS water filters. This past summer, the U-M team traveled to Uganda to interview community members, distribute the filters and surveys, and train enumerators so they could survey the people after the team left. The team also purchased and donated 12 water filters to two primary schools to engage with the community. They helped install the filters, demonstrated use and maintenance, and provided education on water-borne illnesses.

April 2020
Fact Sheet

To facilitate interdisciplinary work in environmentalism, a Dow Distinguished Awards student team established a plan for a net-zero carbon research and education center in Costa Rica. This field station brings together scientists and students from the United States and Costa Rica and provides researchers with a place to investigate relevant sustainability and ecological topics. Working with Sustainability Without Borders, the U-M team constructed a thorough energy forecast that included present and desired electricity demand, gathered data on local renewable energy resources, and created a model to determine how energy could be harnessed most efficiently from crop residue. Compiling the data, the team created a blueprint for a microgrid system that will allow the station to become carbon neutral. This project comprises four phases with the first phase slated for completion in April 2020, and the project will be completed by April 2023. 

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

Healthy and sustainable local food systems foster a productive and functional global food system. A Dow Sustainability Fellows team looked into two key aspects of the food system. One part of this project focused on ethnobotany and edible perennial landscape in partnership with the U-M Campus Farm. The second part of this project focused on addressing food insecurity. About 12% of American households experience food insecurity. At the University of Michigan, a staggering 32% of students are food insecure. Working with the U-M Campus farm, the Dow Fellows team created the Maize and Blue Cupboard Donation Garden to provide locally-grown produce to the Maize and Blue Cupboard, U-M’s food pantry. 

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

Carbon sequestration is the process by which carbon dioxide is removed or stored to reduce the effects of climate change. Forests are considered an important factor in storing carbon, and the carbon sink potential, the degree to which carbon dioxide is absorbed through natural processes, of Michigan forests can be quite large. A Dow Fellows team worked with the Michigan Chapter of The Nature Conservancy to explore the possibility of selling sequestered carbon in the form of carbon credits from improved forest management strategies in the Michigan State Forest system. The team completed multiple interviews to gain a baseline knowledge of how carbon offset markets work. They developed a set of recommendations for the state of Michigan to pursue carbon offsets. This work can serve as a template for other states to implement carbon offsets. 

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

The Upper Peninsula (UP) of Michigan is rural and residents are experiencing significant food insecurity. A Dow Fellows team worked with the Western Upper Planning and Development Region (WUPPDR) and the Western UP Food Systems Council to advance sustainable food systems planning in the region. To develop a comprehensive plan for the region, the team created individual community health profiles to better understand the needs of the community concerning access to food. The Dow team also developed a food systems planning tool kit for local municipalities. They created a Master Planning Addendum Template that can serve as a prelude to a food policy section of a city or county master plan. They also developed a Food Policy Master Planning Catalog to assist WUPPDR in engaging with local food systems planners who wish to incorporate aspects of sustainability into their food systems.

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

An increasing number of major employers are moving to the suburbs of Detroit, making it more difficult for residents of the City of Detroit to access these jobs easily. Residents are spending an excessive amount of time and money traveling to and from work. A Dow Fellows team worked to propose a small-scale alternative to bridge the transportation gap. They envisioned a public-private partnership between the City of Detroit and Wayne County. The team analyzed case studies of other cities that implemented innovative solutions. They also communicated with various Chamber of Commerce workforce agencies and evaluated data to identify demand and plan the logistics of a mobility solution. The team developed a process document for the City of Detroit that is intended to serve as a stepping stone for the implementation of this short-term program. 

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

The Michigan State Parks System has an expansive network of outdoor spaces, forests, and lakes that offer numerous recreational opportunities to Michiganders. The parks system has been facing increasing costs for over a decade to keep up with maintenance, improvements, and shifting demographics. The current funding sources are enough to cover operational costs, but not the increasing cost of capital maintenance projects due to park usage trends. Working with The Nature Conservancy, a Dow Fellows team examined short- and long-term solutions that could be implemented to increase park revenue generation so the parks can be more self-sustaining. They helped reassess the parks system’s revenue model. A short-term recommendation includes implementing a fee-for-service business model, such as charging park goers for sunscreen or camp showers. A long-term solution includes investing in more urban parks for those who live in metro Detroit.

April 2020
Paper/Project Report

Opportunity zones are designed to spur economic development and job creation in underserved communities by providing tax benefits to investors. They are designated by state governors and approved by the federal government in an attempt to address poverty. A Dow Fellow team conducted an analysis of how states engage with and capitalize on opportunity zone incentives. They completed five case studies, focusing on California, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Arizona, and Ohio. They found that each state varies in its strategy to attract investment and in the opportunity zone policies. Some state governments actively seek opportunity zone investment, while others passively allow the market to govern what types of investments will occur. Non-profits in some states also support opportunity zone use through various community engagement measures. However, it is unclear how much money is actually funneled into opportunity zones.                                           

April 2020
Fact Sheet

Carbon sequestration is the process by which carbon dioxide is removed or stored to reduce the effects of climate change. Forests are considered an important factor in storing carbon, and the carbon sink potential, the degree to which carbon dioxide is absorbed through natural processes, of Michigan forests can be quite large. A Dow Fellows team worked with the Michigan Chapter of The Nature Conservancy to explore the possibility of selling sequestered carbon in the form of carbon credits from improved forest management strategies in the Michigan State Forest system. The team completed multiple interviews to gain a baseline knowledge of how carbon offset markets work. They developed a set of recommendations for the state of Michigan to pursue carbon offsets. This work can serve as a template for other states to implement carbon offsets. 

April 2020

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