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Search below to access a wide array of products that were generated or supported by the Graham Institute. For more U-M publications related to sustainability, search the U-M Deep Blue database.

Displaying 81 - 90 of 258
Fact Sheet

The National Estuarine Research Reserve System has a proven track record of successfully transferring and translating reserve science to a broad suite of educators through teacher workshops. In recent years, teachers have expressed a need for curriculum, data sets, and professional development related to climate change. This grant will enable the New England reserves to develop and offer a series of high-quality teacher workshops focused on the story of climate change impacts on coastal habitats, using a variety of data collected at the reserves. The delivery of new and existing curricula will arm over 50 teachers with the tools and confidence they need to effectively bring the discussion of climate change into the classroom.

February 2016
Fishwerks logo
Tool/Model

Fishwerks is a web-based decision support tool that allows users to access optimization tools that identify barriers which, if removed, would maximize habitat improvements for migratory fish in the Great Lakes Basin. This tool was developed by Dr. Peter McIntyre and his team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with support from several partners including the Water Center.

For more information, see the project page.

February 2016
Video

Learn how the Graham Institute helps the U-M community engage with external partners to maximize sustainability impact: Safeguarding our Planet's Life-Support Systems

February 2016
Graphic

Infographic overview of how the Graham institute helps support collaborative sustainability solutions throughout the University of Michigan and beyond.

January 2016
Fact Sheet

An overview of the Graham Sustainability Institute's work and approach. 

January 2016
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

In many developed countries like the United States, the drive for wealth accumulation and a more individualized consumption of goods and services has largely contributed to environmental degradation and climate change (Thøgersen , 2014), economic inequality (Alderson & Nielson, 2002), and a decline in social capital (Putnam, 1995). Community‐based resource sharing, including formal and informal sharing of physical resources, services, and skills, has the potential to decrease aggregate levels of consumption (Botsman & Rodgers, 20011. It also has the potential to improve social equity, helping individuals live within our ecological means (Cooper & Timmer, 2015).

This report highlights research findings and recommendations to encourage sharing within communities. A community survey was developed and guided by key informant interviews with local sharing organization leaders. A team of Dow Master's students distributed the survey to five communities in Southeastern Michigan, and collected data about the benefits, challenges, and opportunities for community‐based resource sharing.

January 2016
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

This paper describes work to develop a model of micrplastic-toxin interactions in freshwater environments. It is a product of the Microplastics in the Great Lakes project supported by the Water Center.

By Jeanne M. Hankett, William R. Collin, Pei Yang, Zhan Chen, and Melissa Duhaime

January 2016
Paper/Project Report

The Dow Fellows team that produced this report proposes a solution for critical funding and capacity shortages in the management of the Illinois Nature Preserves System. The team reviewed the state of Illinois’ public land management needs, existing actors and resources, and proposed the basic architecture of a nonprofit tailored to work in concert with the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission.

January 2016
Paper/Project Report

The purpose of this project was to tackle sustainability on an intrinsic level, and consider platforms or tools to educate people on the importance of sustainability. Our Dow Master's team investigated the potential competing societal values limiting progress towards environmental sustainability within the United States. The vision for this project was seeing such tools being used as exercises in businesses or academia to educate employers, employees, students, and staff members to become more aware about how they approach solving sustainability challenges. Increased understanding of the triple bottom line — considering people, planet, and prosperity — may result in more efficient and effective choices. Our mission was to affect change within ourselves and others leading to more conscientious choices. Underpinning these statements is the assertion or worldview that living in a sustainable world is an ethically desirable pursuit.

December 2015
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

Sustainable Harvest Inc. (SH) is a specialty coffee importer headquartered in Portland, Oregon. SH sources unroasted (green) coffee beans from 18 countries in Latin America and Africa, and sells to roasters in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Over the past 17 years, SH has pioneered the “Relationship Coffee Model” as a method of direct trade, providing significant investment and trainings to producers at origin to facilitate improved coffee bean quality, protect against environmental and price risks, and improve farmer livelihoods. SH also strives to increase transparency along the supply chain.

December 2015

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