Emerging Opportunities Products

Use the search feature below to find Emerging Opportunities-supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 87
Fact Sheet

Columbus is facing climate-related issues that include increasing heavy precipitation events, possibly leading to greater flood risk and reduced water quality, and drier and hotter summers. Columbus also faces increasingly frequent water issues, including flooding events and drinking water contamination from algae and nitrates. City leaders are actively addressing climate adaptation measures and have charged the Columbus Green Team, Climate and Energy Working Group to develop adaptation and mitigation measures.

This fact sheet is part of an urban climate series created to provides an overview of a climate risks. Each fact sheet includes a climate history, key considerations and activities specific to each city.

  • Keywords: Columbus, OH, flooding, heat, climate change, adaptation, extreme weather, renewable energy.
August 2016
Fact Sheet

Hundreds of U.S. cities, with a combined population of about 40 million people, have water infrastructure where stormwater and human sewage mingle in the same network of underground pipes. In a combined sewer system, rainwater typically enters storm drains, mixes with sewage, and is directed to a water treatment plant. The treated water is then discharged into a nearby stream, river, or lake. Occasionally, an influx of snowmelt or heavy rainfall can overwhelm treatment plants. As a result, untreated rainwater and sewage is released, along with a host of industrial pollutants, pathogens, and flushed debris, into the nearest water body. These events are known as combined sewer overflows (CSOs).

Cleveland, OH has long struggled with a number of urban stormwater issues, which directly impact the Lake Erie ecosystem. In 2011, the EPA, the State of Ohio, and the City of Cleveland signed an agreement outlining a plan to bring the City of Cleveland into compliance with federal Clean Water Act standards. Although sustainable energy systems are being installed in the region, there is a severe lack of technical expertise regarding the maintenance and repair of energy systems, resulting in inefficiencies and shortened system lifecycles. Without ensuring the productivity of new sustainable energy systems, the region will likely continue to rely on diesel fuel generators.

This fact sheet is part of the Dow Global Impact Series, which provides a glimpse into the interesting, and often rewarding work of graduate students engaged in the Dow Sustainability Fellows Program. Each summary in the series is based on a report produced by student teams, and highlights key issues, their approach and project outcomes. Videos provide student perspectives about the Fellows Program.

Keywords: Cleveland, OH, stormwater, combined sewer overflows

Learn More

 

 

July 2016
Fact Sheet
To support creative redevelopment efforts in Detroit, the Graham Sustainability Institute partnered with the Detroit-based nonprofit civil and human rights organization Focus: HOPE to conduct the Sustainability and the HOPE Village Initiative (HVI) Integrated Assessment (IA). The HVI is Focus: HOPE’s comprehensive effort to better the education, economic self-sufficiency, and living environment for residents within the 100 blocks surrounding its campus in Detroit by 2031. Through collaboration among U-M researchers, Focus: HOPE staff, and residents around key sustainability issues, the IA project developed analyses and recommendations to help Focus: HOPE advance the HVI and revitalize the neighborhood
 
U-M Faculty Leads: Alicia Alvarez, María Arquero de Alarcón, Priya Baskaran, Craig Borum, John C. Burkhardt, Aline Cotel, Margi Dewar, Eric Dueweke, Robert Grese, Jen Maigret, Lorelle Meadows, Betty Overton-Adkins, Bruce Pietrykowski, Roland Zullo, Paul Draus, and Juliette Roddy.
 
Keywords:  Detroit, economic development, housing, vacant space, abandoned land, neighborhood revitalization, Hope Village
 
July 2016
Fact Sheet

Approximately 30% of land in the City of Detroit is vacant, and infrastructure was built for a population nearly three times its current size. As a result, numerous sustainable redevelopment ideas have been proposed to address these challenges. The University of Michigan Graham Sustainability Institute partnered with Data Driven Detroit on the Detroit Sustainability Indicators Project. This fact sheet provides a summary of the data, tools, and analysis developed to help decision makers in Detroit consider sustainability in their planning efforts.

Investigators: Joan Nassauer, Margeret Dewar, Eric Dueweke, Jen Maigret, Maria Arquero de Alarcon, NicoleScholtz, Stuart Batterman,  Brian Min, Jowei Chen, David Bieri

Keywords: D3, Detroit, Sustianability Indicators 

July 2016
Fact Sheet

With a focus on the role of transportation, researchers working on the Advancing Livable Communities through Sustainable Transportation Integrated Assessment (IA) asked: What policies, interventions, innovations, and partnerships best enable urban areas to create more livable communities? To answer this question, two research teams are working collaboratively with stakeholders and decision makers. Project 1 - Multi-Mode Transportation: Modeling Commuter Choice and Policy Options - Team: Richard Gonzalez, University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, and David Chock, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. Project 2 - A Roadmap for Sustainable Transportation: Connected, Automated, and Electric Vehicle Systems - Team: Steve Underwood, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Connected Vehicle Proving Center, University of Michigan-Dearborn

December 2015
Fact Sheet

This factsheet presents data collected during a 2013-2014 survey of city administrators, managers commissioners, directors of departments, and other key decision-maker throughout the Great Lakes Region. The survey aimed to better understand how, if it all, climate influences the decisions they are making and if so, what they are doing to addressclimate impacts.

December 2015
Paper/Project Report

Beginning in the fall of 2014 and coming to a close in the summer of 2015, the Graham Institute conducted an internal evaluation of  the Great Lakes Assessment Adaptation Assessment for Cities (GLAA-C’s) Integrated Assessment (IA) process. This effort served two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate how well the IA process helped GLAA-C meet its project goals (goals that were put forth in the original funding proposal submitted to the Kresge Foundation), and 2) to help Graham continue to reflect upon and learn from its IA projects in order to improve future IA projects. The evaluation focused on the perspectives of all key stakeholders directly involved in the project, including University of Michigan faculty researchers, city practitioners in the project’s six partner cities, and Graham staff members who contributed to the project.

November 2015
Fact Sheet

The Great Lakes Adaptation Assessment for Cities project increased understanding about the challenges and opportunities municipalities face when adapting to climate change. This work was supported by the Kresge Foundation and the University of Michigan’s Graham Sustainability Institute, which fosters sustainability through knowledge, learning, and leadership. Partners include natural resource managers, watershed councils, municipal governments, state and regional governments, and federal agencies. See: Series of case studies and fact sheets focusing on urban cities

November 2015
Fact Sheet

When we consider household budgets, we think of money that flows in and out. The Great Lakes water budget takes into account all of the water that flows in and out of the basin. The Great Lakes – St. Lawrence River system spans an area of nearly 300,000 square miles (750,000 square km). Freshwater flows from the highest elevation in northwest Ontario, Canada, through the Great Lakes basin, to the lowest elevation in Quebec, Canada, and to the Atlantic Ocean. The components of the water budget between these two ends of the system are monitored at key points. This publication includes a diagram showing the inputs and outputs of the Great Lakes system, including all connecting channels.

October 2015
Fact Sheet

If you live or vacation along the Great Lakes, you have likely become accustomed to shifting sands along the region’s coastline. Shifting sands are one of many changing components of the dynamic Great Lakes system. Considering the relationships between components of a complex system may help us understand why changes occur, and allow us to predict what might change over time.

October 2015

Pages