Emerging Opportunities Products

Use the search feature below to find Emerging Opportunities-supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

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Fact Sheet

The City of Flint is in the early stages of adaptation planning. Flint adopted its first comprehensive Master Plan in fifty years on October 28, 2013. As a follow up to this effort, the city is working to update its zoning code, Capital Improvement Plan (CIP), and other related plans and policies. Since 1960, the city has lost nearly half of its population and over 70,000 jobs. However, city planners and community stakeholders feel that Flint is ready to embrace wide reaching change and are eager to begin a process of rebuilding and visioning for a future that addresses systematic problems in place of quick-fix solutions.

October 2015
Fact Sheet

Located at the southern reaches of the Great Lakes region in southern Ohio, the City of Dayton faces similar challenges to other ‘rust belt’ cities. Dayton’s population peaked in the 1960’s at approximately 260,000 and since then has declined to the current population of 141,527. Parts of the city have upwards of 30% vacancy rate. Despite these challenges, the city staff is determined and energized to develop a more sustainable city so that Dayton becomes a ‘city of choice’ for the region and beyond.

October 2015
Fact Sheet

The City of Ann Arbor has a long history as a progressive city with strong community engagement. Despite this, the city faces challenges keeping the community informed of emerging programs and ongoing efforts due to the city’s many university students and other transient residents. Ann Arbor also faces the challenge that a significant percentage of property within the city limits falls under the public domain and is not subject to local taxes. Much of this public land also falls outside of the city’s regulatory jurisdiction

October 2015
Paper/Project Report

There is significant momentum behind natural gas extraction efforts in the United States, with many states viewing it as an opportunity to create jobs and foster economic growth. Natural gas extraction has also been championed as a way to move toward domestic energy security and a cleaner energy supply. First demonstrated in the 1940s, hydraulic fracturing—injecting fracturing fluids into the target formation at a force exceeding the parting pressure of the rock (shale) thus inducing a network of fractures through which oil or natural gas can flow to the wellbore—is now the predominant method used to extract natural gas in the United States.

 

Keywords: Fracking, hydraulic fracturing, oil or natural gas extraction, water quality, Graham Sustainability Institute, Michigan

September 2015
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Paper/Project Report

This paper describes the specific activities undertaken as part of an integrated assessment on artisanal and small-scale gold mining activities in Ghana.

September 2015
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Paper/Project Report

An assessment of the potential ecological risk of heavy metals and a metalloid in agricultural soils in 19 communities in Tarkwa, Ghana.

September 2015
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Paper/Project Report

This article describes a modified Delphi approach in which 27 multi-disciplinary academics and 22 stakeholders from Ghana and North America were polled about ways to address negative effects of small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. 

September 2015
Publication Cover
Paper/Project Report

This report is part of the Hydraulic Fracturing in Michigan Integrated Assessment (IA) which began in 2012. The guiding question of the IA is, “What are the best environmental, economic, social, and technological approaches for managing hydraulic fracturing in the State of Michigan?”

The purpose of the IA is to present information that:

  • expands and clarifies the scope of policy options, and 
  • allows a wide range of decision makers to make choices based on their preferences and values.

As a result, the IA does not advocate for recommended courses of action. Rather, it presents information about the likely strengths, weaknesses, and outcomes of various options to support informed decision making.

The project’s first phase involved the preparation of technical reports on key topics related to hydraulic fracturing in Michigan which were released by the University of Michigan’s Graham Sustainability Institute in September 2013. This document is the final report for the IA.

The IA report has been informed by the technical reports, input from an Advisory Committee with representatives from corporate, governmental, and non-governmental organizations, a peer review panel, and numerous public comments received throughout this process. However, the report does not necessarily reflect the views of the Advisory Committee or any other group which has provided input. As with preparation of the technical reports, all decisions regarding content of project analyses and reports have been determined by the IA Report and Integration Teams.

While the IA has attempted to provide a comprehensive review of the current status and trends of high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF), specifically, in Michigan (the technical reports) and an analysis of policy options (this report) there are certain limitations which must be recognized:

  • The assessment does not and was not intended to provide a quantitative assessment (human health or environmental) of the potential risks associated with HVHF. Completing such assessments is currently a key point of national discussion related to HVHF despite the challenges of uncertainty and limited available data–particularly baseline data.
  • The assessment does not provide an economic analysis or a cost-benefit analysis of the presented policy options. While economic strengths and/or weaknesses were identified for many of the options, these should not be viewed as full economic analyses. Additional study would be needed to fully assess the economic impact of various policy actions, including no change of current policy.

Keywords: Fracking, hydraulic fracturing, oil or natural gas extraction, water quality, Graham Sustainability Institute, Michigan

September 2015
Michigan Journal of Sustainability
Paper/Project Report

An article about the presentation of the methods and technological infrastructure used to develop the Internet-based Heat Evaluation and Assessment Tool (I-HEAT) published in the Michigan Journal of Sustainability.

September 2015
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Paper/Project Report

A multiple media exposure assessment and cross-sectional study of mercury conducted in 2010 through 2012 in northeast Ghana with a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, a subsistence farming community, Gorogo, and an urban ASGM gold refinery in Bolgatanga.

September 2015

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