Emerging Opportunities Products

Use the search feature below to find Emerging Opportunities-supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets.

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Fact Sheet

Approximately 30% of land in the City of Detroit is vacant, and infrastructure was built for a population nearly three times its current size. As a result, numerous sustainable redevelopment ideas have been proposed to address these challenges. The University of Michigan Graham Sustainability Institute partnered with Data Driven Detroit on the Detroit Sustainability Indicators Project. This fact sheet provides a summary of the data, tools, and analysis developed to help decision makers in Detroit consider sustainability in their planning efforts.

Investigators: Joan Nassauer, Margeret Dewar, Eric Dueweke, Jen Maigret, Maria Arquero de Alarcon, NicoleScholtz, Stuart Batterman,  Brian Min, Jowei Chen, David Bieri

Keywords: D3, Detroit, Sustianability Indicators 

July 2016
Fact Sheet

With a focus on the role of transportation, researchers working on the Advancing Livable Communities through Sustainable Transportation Integrated Assessment (IA) asked: What policies, interventions, innovations, and partnerships best enable urban areas to create more livable communities? To answer this question, two research teams are working collaboratively with stakeholders and decision makers. Project 1 - Multi-Mode Transportation: Modeling Commuter Choice and Policy Options - Team: Richard Gonzalez, University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, and David Chock, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. Project 2 - A Roadmap for Sustainable Transportation: Connected, Automated, and Electric Vehicle Systems - Team: Steve Underwood, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Connected Vehicle Proving Center, University of Michigan-Dearborn

December 2015
Fact Sheet

This factsheet presents data collected during a 2013-2014 survey of city administrators, managers commissioners, directors of departments, and other key decision-maker throughout the Great Lakes Region. The survey aimed to better understand how, if it all, climate influences the decisions they are making and if so, what they are doing to addressclimate impacts.

December 2015
Paper/Project Report

Beginning in the fall of 2014 and coming to a close in the summer of 2015, the Graham Institute conducted an internal evaluation of  the Great Lakes Assessment Adaptation Assessment for Cities (GLAA-C’s) Integrated Assessment (IA) process. This effort served two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate how well the IA process helped GLAA-C meet its project goals (goals that were put forth in the original funding proposal submitted to the Kresge Foundation), and 2) to help Graham continue to reflect upon and learn from its IA projects in order to improve future IA projects. The evaluation focused on the perspectives of all key stakeholders directly involved in the project, including University of Michigan faculty researchers, city practitioners in the project’s six partner cities, and Graham staff members who contributed to the project.

November 2015
Fact Sheet

The Great Lakes Adaptation Assessment for Cities project increased understanding about the challenges and opportunities municipalities face when adapting to climate change. This work was supported by the Kresge Foundation and the University of Michigan’s Graham Sustainability Institute, which fosters sustainability through knowledge, learning, and leadership. Partners include natural resource managers, watershed councils, municipal governments, state and regional governments, and federal agencies. See: Series of case studies and fact sheets focusing on urban cities

November 2015
Fact Sheet

When we consider household budgets, we think of money that flows in and out. The Great Lakes water budget takes into account all of the water that flows in and out of the basin. The Great Lakes – St. Lawrence River system spans an area of nearly 300,000 square miles (750,000 square km). Freshwater flows from the highest elevation in northwest Ontario, Canada, through the Great Lakes basin, to the lowest elevation in Quebec, Canada, and to the Atlantic Ocean. The components of the water budget between these two ends of the system are monitored at key points. This publication includes a diagram showing the inputs and outputs of the Great Lakes system, including all connecting channels.

October 2015
Fact Sheet

If you live or vacation along the Great Lakes, you have likely become accustomed to shifting sands along the region’s coastline. Shifting sands are one of many changing components of the dynamic Great Lakes system. Considering the relationships between components of a complex system may help us understand why changes occur, and allow us to predict what might change over time.

October 2015
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Paper/Project Report

This paper describes factors related to demographics and health in an artisanal and small-scale gold mining community in Ghana’s Upper East Region.

October 2015
Fact Sheet

Located in Northwest Ohio on the shores of Lake Erie, the City of Toledo identifies climate change as a matter of environmental, economic, and health concern. The city has a total population of 287,208 spread over 84 sq. miles. The city is built over a wetland area and ground saturation and stormwater overflow pose major threats to city infrastructure and health. Deteriorating water infrastructure is a major issue throughout the city and region. However, strong leadership by city staff has resulted in progressive action to improve water systems and increase public awareness across the region

October 2015
Fact Sheet

Located on the north shore of Lake Superior, the City of Thunder Bay is a unique urban hub in an otherwise sparsely populated area. Mining and forestry are key economic drivers of the region. Over the past decade, the city has made strides to incorporate sustainability and climate mitigation into its corporate policies and since 2005, the EarthCare program has served as a collaboration between the Municipality and the community to move sustainability goals forward.

October 2015

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