Graham Sustainability Institute

Emerging Opportunities Products

Use the search feature below to find Emerging Opportunities-supported products, including papers, videos, and fact sheets. Alternatively, you may search/browse products across the entire institute.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 97
Fact Sheet, Tool/Model

Great Lakes cities face the simultaneous and intertwined challenges of climate change adaptation and racial inequality. Urban flooding, in particular, is a growing challenge, and Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities are often most affected. This short overview complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation, designed to help cities center racial justice in flood adaptation planning.

July 2021
Fact Sheet

This short document complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation. This document focuses on the report's fifth principle: facilitating cross-sector collaboration. It includes a checklist for putting the principle into action, as well as a case study from the Great Lakes.

July 2021
Fact Sheet

This short document complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation. This document focuses on the report's fourth principle: centering equity in data collection and analysis. It includes a checklist for putting the principle into action, as well as a case study from the Great Lakes.

July 2021
Fact Sheet

This short document complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation. This document focuses on the report's third principle: co-owning planning efforts with communities. It includes a checklist for putting the principle into action, as well as a case study from the Great Lakes.

July 2021
Fact Sheet

This short document complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation. This document focuses on the report's second principle: institutionalizing representation. It includes a checklist for putting the principle into action, as well as a case study from the Great Lakes.

July 2021
Fact Sheet

This short document complements the full report, Centering Racial Justice in Urban Flood Adaptation. This document focuses on the report's first principle: focusing on root causes. It includes a checklist for putting the principle into action, as well as a case study from the Great Lakes.

July 2021
Paper/Project Report

Great Lakes cities face the simultaneous and intertwined challenges of climate change adaptation and racial inequality. Decision-makers, planners, advocates, and residents in the region increasingly recognize the need to respond to these challenges and are taking steps to do so. This report aims to serve as a guide and resource for local policies, programs, investments, and advocacy that can help prepare our region for climate change and strengthen our communities. The report provides a set of five principles for centering racial justice in adaptation planning and policy, focusing specifically on how these apply to efforts to adapt to increasing flood risk due to storms and heavy rain events.

June 2021
Paper/Project Report
As Earth’s climate rapidly changes, species range shifts are considered key to species persistence. However, some range-shifting species will alter community structure and ecosystem processes. By adapting existing invasion risk assessment frameworks, we can identify characteristics shared with high-impact introductions and thus predict potential impacts. There are fundamental differences between introduced and range-shifting species, primarily shared evolutionary histories between range shifters and their new community. Nevertheless, impacts can occur via analogous mechanisms, such as wide dispersal, community disturbance and low biotic resistance. As ranges shift in response to climate change, we have an opportunity to develop plans to facilitate advantageous movements and limit those that are problematic.
April 2020
Graphic

Catalyst Grant 2020 Powerpoint Slide

January 2020
Paper/Project Report

The struggle for environmental justice in California began decades ago and continues today.  Environmental justice results from community level actions that build power and models; influence the political process and secure unprecedented legislation; and implement cutting-edge programs. Progress has not been easy.  Many challenges had to be overcome, and political opposition has been consistent.  The resources described in this compilation are the result of leadership from many communities, sometimes in collaboration with public agencies and sometimes in tension.  There have been some significant successes at the local, regional and state-wide levels.  However, much more is needed to address the many challenges related to environmental injustice and the climate crisis if we are to build truly equitable, healthy and sustainable communities for the 21st century.   

September 2019

Pages